Hello!

Welcome to The Epic! I am launching this blog as a manifesto for and a guide to living well. The title and motto of the blog are taken from the Epicureans, at least some of whom believed in the notion that not one minute of the future was guaranteed to them and that as a result they had the duty to live life to its fullest every moment.

I believe in discovering fun and pleasurable things wherever I find myself each day and I am told I have a knack for unearthing them. My hope is that by sharing in my pleasures and some of my ways of finding them you will begin to collect all the riches that lie in the moments of your life. They are there. Take them! All our lives should be.....Epic.

Monday, May 14, 2012

Paris: Arrival Day.

This was my first view of France after about nine hours of night flying.  Atlanta to Newfoundland then a hard right turn.  Under Greenland.  Under Iceland.  Down the English Channel.  Then here.  It was very cloudy all the way so you could not see anything until we broke the ceiling shown at the back of the photo. 
I slept well all night.  Not surprising after the marvelous treatment in Air France's Business Class.  I should have anticipated what was in store about a minute after settling into a huge seat [later a bed] when a pretty blond attendant offered me a glass of Champagne. I didn't want to hurt the poor woman's feelings.  I accepted a glass.  Then another. A happy glow effused the cabin.  I noticed the glow becoming even warmer after we got to altitude, a couple of hours had passed, it was time for....


...the printed dinner menu.  As a cart came around with aperitifs (make mine Ricard) 


I nibbled on extraordinary little crepe biscuits filled with cheese...


as I studied the menu and made my first dining choices of the trip.  The amuse-bouche was shrimp with guacamole and pink grapefruit.  I made short work of that...


...and the spoon was tres elegant.  Then an appetizer course of Serrano ham, fish terrine and creme mayonnaise with herbs along with a salad...


which was just lovely.  You may have noticed the Bordeaux in the photo.  They had several nice bottles to choose from.  The one shown is an Haut-Medoc Chateau Cantermerle Grand Cru Classe 2006. 

At this point, I am getting VERY used to flying on Air France Business Class.  The main course I selected was beef tournados au poivre with sauteed potatoes and green beans.  The dish was perfectly seasoned and prepared and the green peppercorn sauce added just the right amount of underlying fire to compliment the Chateau Cantermerle...


Yes, that is a [temporarily] empty wine glass.  The flight staff was very attentive and a lot of wine was poured during the flight.  Even to passengers other than moi.  After the main course, it was on to the cheese course...


...scrumptious.  More Chateau Cantermerle.  Oh, and a trio of desserts...


...lemon square, triple chocolate cake, raspberry macaron.  Really great coffee.  You can see the heavy silver in the photos.  That was a nice aesthetic addition also.  As the attendant cleared the linen table cloth and the [empty] dessert plate, I sank back into the big leather seat with a snifter of Calvados and I fell into a deep luxury coma.  Another Calvados [or two] later and I pushed the buttons that converted my seat into a comfortable bed.  I slept a dreamless, deep sleep.

I was gently awakened for breakfast which was marvelous also but which I need not describe in more detail.  I was pretty diverted by the map display which showed we were nearing Europe.  My second view of France appeared a hour later...


and shortly afterward we had landed at CDG and I was wandering down toward customs.

After slipping through the checkpoint unimpeded, I collected my bags with surprising ease and met the young man assigned to collect me and take me to my hotel on the Ile Saint-Louis.  I walked up and introduced myself in French, he did the same, and he asked me how many days I was staying in Paris.  I told him [now on thinner linguistic ice] and I apologized and said that my French was very bad.  He replied that his English was "mauvais".  I had survived my first conversation on the ground in France!

I have written before about how heartily I adopt von Clausewitz' first principle of securing one's home base while travelling.  The Hotel Saint-Louis en L'Isle was the perfect home in Paris for a man of my tastes.  Twenty Rooms.  Wonderful staff.  And the coziest room imaginable. 




The photos above are of my home in Paris, my perfect room [in some tourist disarray] and the main street of the island outside the front door of the hotel facing the Ile de la Cite and Notre Dame Cathedral.  The weather the first day was cold and overcast at first with the sun breaking through optimistically at times.  After checking in, I decided to explore Notre Dame and the surrounding areas. 


This was the view on the foot bridge spanning the Seine between the Ile Saint-Louis and the Ile de la Cite.  Pretty weather, no?  Little did I know this would be the best day of the trip.


Notre Dame is 850 years old this year.  It is breathtaking and inspiring.  I admit sitting a few moments and saying thanks for my incredible opportunity to make this trip.  You could probably spend an entire day inside Notre Dame...


[organ loft]...



[one of the small chapels surrounding the main Nave]

Saint Joan D'Arc.



A sober reminder of World War I. 

You walk out of a place like Notre Dame in sensory overload.  A feeling that I would have many more times on the trip.  But all this history makes a fellow hungry.  And thirsty.  So I crossed the Isle de Cite and moved to the Right Bank to scout the lay of the land for my first planned dining adventure the following day.  And to look for my first cafe meal.  What my great pal Colonel Joe might call a "recon in force".  I bought a pack of French cigarettes with filters and a lighter with a picture of Marilyn Monroe holding down her dress on it.  Not for smoking but because I had read somewhere that having cigarettes and a lighter in your pocket is an entree into cafe society.  One has to be prepared in such things.  I saw the Paris City Hall...


...and the famous Metro subway entrance art...



I know.  I didn't see that other sign until after I looked at the photo in my phone.  Insidious forces are lurking even in Paris.  It is the nature of our time. 

You can tell that a city is dedicated to dining and drinking when there are a dozen cafes and bistros on every block.  Even a person with my special ESP for good places becomes jangled when the green light is going off in his head every fifty yards.  It started to drizzle and then rain.  Hard.  I saw a cafe before me with a lot of customers, a few open tables, and an intriguing name...


L'Amazonial.  Just the place for me.  I sat where the fellows in blue are in the photo and ordered my first cafe meal of roasted duck, mashed potatoes, and raisin/cognac sauce.


The duck was very tender and the sauce perfect. I also had a carafe of the house Bordeaux [which was exceptional and fairly priced] and a nice slice of Camembert along with my coffee.  This was my first meal in Paris and the best duck I have ever had.  One notices immediately that the food tastes much better than at home.  Much, much fresher.  Things actually have flavor.  Admittedly some of this perception was due to emotional involvement on my part, but I think it is actually true.  With one exception, every morsel of food I ate on the trip was very, very good.  As I sat and sipped my wine, I looked out of the covered terrace of L'Amazonial at the drizzling rain.  I sat there comfortably for a long time.  I wrote some notes in one of my new notebooks.  I could have sat there the rest of the trip.  This is why I had come.  To sit for hours at a cafe table, watching the world pass by, scribbling occasional notes, drinking good wine after a superb meal. Nothing in particular to do.

Eventually, I realized that I was either going to order another meal or drink wine until I fell over or I would have to continue my first day as a Parisian flaneur.  The rain stopped and I headed for the Palais Royal and its reportedly pretty and secluded interior park right across from the Louvre.




I spent the rest of the afternoon sitting by this fountain reading Dutourd in the afterglow of a perfect day.  I may have dozed.  The sun retreated again behind clouds.  The wind picked up.  Rain began.  The day was sliding into dusk.  All of a sudden, I felt heavy fatigue.  The dreaded jet lag.  I had been warned not to succumb to the temptation of sleeping as soon as I arrived.  There was only one thing left to do.  I had to follow von Clausewitz again and secure a home bar. 

Back on the Isle Saint-Louis, my ESP went off strongly when I passed the Pledge Bar a couple of blocks from my hotel.  The sign was welcoming...


...as was the view into the walk-down bar from the sidewalk through the front window.  A small, narrow joint with a tray of different sausages and cheese on the bar.  And bowls of potato chips. Friendly people.  Great barman.  Good Calvados for five Euros.  For a double.  A.J. Liebling held circa 1949 that drinking post-war Calvados was akin to stabbing yourself in the hand with a pen knife.  I did detailed and hefty exploration of this dilemma during the entire trip and I can happily report that the situation has righted itself considerably.  Good Calvados is plentiful in Paris and fairly priced.  Having secured a home bar, befriended [in French] the bartender and totted a little Calvados along with some wickedly hot, marvelously flavorful sausage from Provence or Spain or somewhere, I strolled out into the Parisian wee small morning hours.  Rain was tumbling down.  I turned up the collar of my L.L. Bean all weather jacket, felt the warm fuzzy lining all around my neck and chin, and turned the corner for my hotel and a warm bed.  Day one.  A triumph.   

8 comments:

William Widmaier said...

Bravo!

Turling said...

We were in London over the two week Christmas holiday. Jumped on the train and went to Paris for a couple of days. Your day 1 was pretty much our day 1, minus the bar. Well done, sir.

Tucker said...

Splendid!

Mike said...

What a great story!
I'm looking forward to read more!

The Daily Connoisseur said...

How absolutely delightful. I wish you'd done a video blog too! I am entranced and love that you shared what food you had with us. Thank you. Looking forward to more!

Uncle Beefy said...

Wow. It's great that we weren't there together! If there are two things in this world I can't stand it's Paris and food. ;) And you were clearly embracing both aplenty on Day 1. Glorious!

M.Lane said...

Thanks everyone! It has been crazy here so I am delayed in chapter 3. Mon Oncle, it gets a LOT better food wise....

Jennifer, trust me. I would not be as good on video as you are!!! Congrats on the newest Connoisseur!!

More to come...
ML

Suburban Princess said...

I am waiting for the moment the taxi shows up and Hemmingway tells you to get in!